Tuesday, July 29, 2014

thefilmstage:

Steven Spielberg and George Lucas congratulate each other (and James Cameron) on their box-office hits.

littlehorrorshop:

Mildred Davis enjoys a drink at the soda fountain in Safety Last! (1923)

littlehorrorshop:

Mildred Davis enjoys a drink at the soda fountain in Safety Last! (1923)

medicluigi:

What Fandoms see:

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What Really Happens:

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littlehorrorshop:

Carole Lombard applies makeup on the sporting track in Run Girl Run, 1928

The films are for grown-ups, but they remain fairy tales and have the impact of fairy tales. For me, cinema is about imagination, and the imagination is best communicated in the form of parables - meaning fairytales. Not in the Walt Disney sense, though. They draw attention to themselves as fairy tales - everything is made up and cleaned up and sugary sweet, and this makes the tale less suggestive. To me, anyway. I think that fairy tales capture the audience’s imagination when the setting is realistic rather than fantastical. The fusion of realistic setting and fantasy story can give film a sense of myth, of legend. Once upon a time… Sergio Leone